Casino

Nevada Resort Association Up Against the Proposed Tax Hike

The Clark County Education Association (CCEA) has dedicatedly started working on gathering support for its initiative to increase the taxes paid by casinos on the revenue earned through gambling by more than 40%; they plan to hike tax rates to 9.75% from 6,75%.

This move of the CCEA is facing vehement protests from all the casino owners. Additionally, there is resistance on the way voters are being tricked into voting for this measure during the ballots in November 2022. The Nevada Resort Association (NRA), the umbrella association of all the casinos in the area, is upset that the language used by CCEA is misguiding and also there are many flaws in the proposal presented by them that needs to be looked into before it is put up for ballot polls.

The CCEA supposedly wants to allow voters to deliberate on the proposal of raising the tax rate of the casinos to gather more capital for the education fund of the state. However, according to the NRA, this information is not accurate. They say that the money collected as taxes will first go to the general fund of the state; from there, only a portion of it will be utilized for the educational programs run by the state. NRA asserts that the misleading language used by CCEA is illegal and hence is dragging the group to court to try and stall this measure from moving forward; a lawsuit has been filed in the Clark County Court.

NRA has also raised questions regarding the time when the newly increased tax rates will be implemented. They have challenged the date stated by the state agency, which is January 2023.  NRA emphasizes that it is impossible to start at the given time because at least 38 days is required for officially reviewing and then getting a green signal from the Supreme Court after the voters vote in favor of the measure, as the taxes would be collected monthly.

The attorney on behalf of the NRA, Matt Griffin, explained that,

It is important that voters understand that despite CCEA’s representations, the Legislature would have no duty to use any of this money for education. The Legislature would be free to spend it on state employee salaries, construction of state buildings, or anything else.

Janice Graziano

Janice has joined Times of Casino team as a casino news writer. Along with writing, she is additionally a content manager. Janice has over five years of experience in inscribing. Her zealousness for casino and online gaming draw her to casino industry. In her spare time, she relishes playing online poker games.

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